Chrome 25: All Chrome Offline Extensions Will Be Disabled

tool2Starting with version 25 of Google Chrome, browser extensions installed offline by other applications will not be enabled until users give their permission through a dialog box in the browser interface.

At the moment developers have several options to install extensions offline — not using the browser interface — in Google Chrome for Windows. One of them involves adding special entries in the Windows registry that tell Chrome that a new extension has been installed and should be enabled.

In order to prevent this type of abuse, starting with Chrome 25, the browser will automatically disable all previously installed “external” extensions and will present users with a one-time dialog box to choose which ones they want to re-enable.

Source: InfoWorld

Firefox 20 Plays H.264 Videos

Users of the Firefox web browser on Windows can now dump Adobe Flash and still watch H.264-encoded videos online.

Fresh overnight builds of Firefox 20 will now play footage found on HTML5 websites, such as YouTube and Vimeo, that use the patent-encumbered video codec – without the need for Adobe’s oft-criticised plugin, which also handles H.264.

However, H.264, which is licensed from the MPEG-LA patent pool, remains the standard for video playback for desktop web browsing and handheld devices.

Source: The Register

Java Update: Users Can Now Block Web-based Java Content Completely

A recent Java 7 update allows users to completely prevent Java applications from running inside browsers or to restrict how Web-based Java content is handled by the Java Runtime Environment (JRE) client. These features will benefit security-conscious users, but companies still have to find methods of isolating older Java versions, security experts say.

Java 7 Update 10 (7u10), released on Dec. 11, does not address any security vulnerabilities, but provides several security enhancements. According to its release notes, the new version provides users with “the ability to disable any Java application from running in the browser.” This can be done from the “Security” tab on the Java control panel by clearing the “enable Java content in the browser” checkbox.

Security experts have long advised users to remove the Java plug-in from their Web browsers in order to protect themselves from the increasingly prevalent Web-based attacks that exploit Java vulnerabilities to infect computers with malware.

However, in order to follow this advice users had to remove the plug-in from all of their browsers one by one and were often forced to redo the process after installing new Java updates.

Source: InfoWorld

How To Find Your Way Around SharePoint 2010

SharePoint has taken the world by storm. As of last year, if Microsoft broke SharePoint’s revenue out as a single entity, it would have created the fifth largest software company in existence, according to Jared Spataro, senior director of SharePoint product management at Microsoft.

All told, hundreds of thousands of SharePoint licenses and millions of installations of both the free and the paid enterprise edition exist in the world.

All of which means there’s a good chance you use SharePoint — even just a little bit — if you have any sort of corporate job. But most users barely scratch the surface of what is possible in Microsoft’s premier collaboration platform.

Or perhaps your company has been using SharePoint 2007 and now you’ve got 2010 rolled out, and you’re feeling lost.

There’s nothing to worry about. With this cheat sheet, you’ll learn all of the basics of navigating and using a SharePoint site, and where to go to find some of the most popular customization options as well.

Source: InfoWorld

Sneek Peak on Apple Mac Mini

The thing is, you see, the new Apple’s HDMI performance is crap. Hook the Mini up to an ordinary 1080p TV – as I did – through an HDMI cable and you’ll think you’ve gone back in time to the 8-bit VGA era: dithered colours, jagged curves and diagonal lines, the lot.

Some folk have said their HDMI output flickers too – something that past models have, some say, been afflicted by – but I didn’t see that, just the poor colour quality.

The irony is that the Mac Mini was Apple’s first computer to support HDMI, though it built one of the ports into the first-generation Apple TV set-top box too. I have one of these old ATVs, hacked to run the open source XBMC media centre software, which it runs a treat.

It also generates an HDMI image that’s just fine. So I know the new Mini’s woeful HDMI output is nothing to do with either HDMI or my television.

Source: The Register

Windows 8: Microsoft’s Best-Performing Edition of Windows

Unlike rival Microsoft, Apple has consistently been able to get a significant portion of its Mac customers to quickly upgrade to the newest version of OS X, data from a Web measurement company showed.

The last three versions of Apple’s desktop operating system have been adopted at a rate almost three times that of the best-performing edition of Windows, 2009’s Windows 7.

Windows 8, which shipped in late October 2012, looks to be on the same usage uptake trajectory as Vista, although that could, of course, change in the upcoming months.

By comparison, Windows 7’s best deal was a short-lived $50-per-license deal during the summer of 2009. An upgrade to Vista’s primary consumer-grade edition ran $159 in early 2007.

Source: InfoWorld

Adobe Offers HTML5

 Despite significant investments from Microsoft, Google, and others, HTML5 remains not quite good enough for a range of apps.

The company that gave us Flash, Adobe, has jumped into HTML5 with both feet, buying Nitobi, the sponsor of the popular PhoneGap project, and releasing a promising set of HTML5 authoring tools.

Adobe, once pilloried by Steve Jobs for inflicting bloated Flash on the industry, may come back to haunt Apple by replacing native iOS development with serious HTML5 development tools.

Apple was one of the earliest advocates for HTML5, and Steve Jobs chided Adobe for its proprietary approach to Flash.

Source:  The Register